Featured Articles

  • Scientists boost gene knockdown in human cells via chemically modified RNA CRISPR
    on August 2, 2021 at 6:01 pm

    In the latest of ongoing efforts to expand technologies for modifying genes and their expression, researchers have developed chemically modified guide RNAs for a CRISPR system that targets RNA instead of DNA. These chemically-modified guide RNAs significantly enhance the ability to target — trace, edit, and/or knockdown — RNA in human cells.

  • Natural mineral hackmanite enables new method of x-ray imaging
    on August 2, 2021 at 6:01 pm

    Researchers have discovered a new method of X-ray imaging based on the coloring abilities of the natural mineral hackmanite. The international group of researchers also found out how and why hackmanite changes color upon exposure to X-rays.

  • Molecular switch regulates fat burning in mice
    on August 2, 2021 at 6:01 pm

    New research demonstrates a metabolic regulatory molecule called Them1 prevents fat burning in cells by blocking access to their fuel source. The study may contribute to the development of a new type of obesity treatment.

Net worth at midlife inversely associated with mortality, cohort study finds

According to a new cohort study of 5414 people, those who had a higher net worth by midlife had a considerably lower risk of mortality over the next 24 years. Sociologists have long been interested in the connection between socioeconomic status and longevity. Longitudinal studies have shown that health and income provide substantial health-related benefits such as better living conditions, access to better health services, and even better overall mental well being. In a recently published study, researchers at Northwestern University uncovered a…

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Scientists expect surge in RSV in young children due to pandemic lockdowns

Children may be more susceptible to RSV since most pregnant women and babies did not develop immunity during the previous season. As COVID-19 cases have declined and public health measures brought on by the pandemic have been lifted, cases of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) have risen rapidly in Australia and, more recently, the United States. The respiratory syncytial virus is a virus that infects the lower respiratory system and can lead to serious illness and death. Respiratory syncytial virus…

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Genetically-predisposed ‘morning people’ adjust to daylight savings time faster

The so-called “early birds,” who are normally early risers in the morning, acclimated to the hour advance of daylight savings within a few days, according to the study. It took almost a week for those who were not early risers to acclimatize. Daylight Savings Time (DST),  the practice of people advancing their clocks so that darkness arrives at a later hour, has been known to have a negative effect on both the individual, as well as society as a…

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UN study confirms relationship between pollution-related deaths and areas at highest risk for climate change impacts

In a study of risk estimates of climate change impact and toxic emissions, Notre Dame researchers identified a statistically significant link between the spatial distribution of global climate risk and toxic pollution-related deaths. According to more than 97% of actively publishing climatologists, climate-warming trends over the last century are highly likely due to human activity. The majority of the world’s main scientific organizations have released public statements backing this stance.  To name a few, the American Chemical Society (ACS)…

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Computer-model shows mRNA vaccine provides an extra 7.4 days of life when faced with post-infection complications

According to the model, if a 65-year-old patient experiences long-term post-infection problems and has received the mRNA vaccination (Pfizer or Moderna), they would live, on average, 7.4 days longer than if they had not gotten the vaccine. When compared to the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, obtaining the mRNA vaccination would provide the patient a little more than an extra day of life. Hesitancy regarding receiving the COVID-19 vaccine is an issue that is at the forefront of reasons why…

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Researchers find an alternative route for SARS-CoV-2 to infect brain

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have built a stem cell model that helps explain how SARS-CoV-2 reaches the brain. Clinical evidence suggests that SARS-CoV-2 can have an effect on the central nervous system, either directly or indirectly, however the mechanisms are unknown. Pericytes are perivascular cells that are thought to be SARS-CoV-2 infection locations in the brain. Perivascular cells are cells that line the inside of capillary walls. The cells aid in the development…

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Human gene variant directly linked to autism spectrum disorders

When wild-type mice were given the challenge of switching between two activities at random, they adapted quickly, but SUV39H2-deficient animals took much longer. Critical genes that are typically repressed throughout early development were discovered to be switched on in the experimental mice, according to the researchers. Throughout human development, genes are turned on and off. However, because of genetic diversity, genes that are turned off in some people remain on in others. In humans, this has been demonstrated to…

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Azithromycin shown to be ineffective in treating COVID-19

In the randomized clinical trial, there was no significant difference in symptom absence 14 days after drug administration between individuals given azithromycin and the placebo. Furthermore, the azithromycin group visited the emergency room more frequently than the placebo group. Azithromycin has conjured excitement amongst medical researchers as a potential drug to combat COVID-19. If it could show that it reduces the severity of symptoms in COVID-19 positive patients, azithromycin could be an excellent candidate for outpatient therapy, as it…

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Newly developed exosome spray promotes myocardial tissue regeneration

In the post-injury heart, a newly developed exosome spray (EXOS) improved cardiac function, reduced fibrosis, and boosted endogenous myocardial tissue regeneration. Cardiac regenerative medicine has the ability to heal damaged myocardium while also improving revascularization in injured myocardial tissue. Minimally invasive exosome spray not only improved the retention of MSC-derived exosomes on the heart, but it also reduced the amount of stress associated with open-chest surgery.  Every 36 seconds in the United States, one person dies from cardiovascular disease.…

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Physical exercise and antidepressants similarly effective in reducing depressive symptoms in the short-term

When compared to the antidepressant treatment group, physical exercise as a therapy alternative was equally beneficial in alleviating depressive symptoms in the short term (1 month). Depression is a common and disabling disorder that affects 1 in every 5 people at some point in their lives and more than 120 million people worldwide. While antidepressant drugs and/or psychological therapy are commonly used to treat depression, other therapeutic options have gained popularity in recent years. Physical activity as a potential…

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Researchers develop first-of-its-kind sensor that allows prosthetic hands to ‘feel’

Researchers from Florida Atlantic University’s College of Engineering and Computer Science created photolithographically manufactured, highly robust liquid metal tactile sensors (LMS) and successfully incorporated them into a prosthetic hand’s fingertips, helping to restore tactile sensation with prosthetic limb use. Devising a way to integrate hierarchical multi-finger tactile sensations has become a challenge of great interest for the field of biomedical research, as it could provide prosthetic hands with a greater level of intelligence. Touch sensation for prosthetic hands is…

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Post-COVID-19 syndrome associated with depression, 26% feel they haven’t fully recovered six months later

After six to eight months, 26% indicated they felt they hadn’t fully recovered from COVID-19. Furthermore, 55% of participants said they were abnormally fatigued, 25% said they experienced mild difficulty breathing, and 26% had DASS-21 scores that were indicative of depression. While early public health approaches to the SARS-CoV-2 virus concentrated on lowering COVID-19’s acute impact, a growing body of research suggests that the infection can have long-term physical and mental health implications. In a new study published in…

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Artificial intelligence developed that finds disease targets and predicts a drug’s chances of FDA approval

Researchers have developed a new method of looking for disease targets using artificial intelligence, which then forecasts whether or not a treatment will be authorized by the FDA. In its current condition, drug discovery is wasteful and burdened with increasing failure rates, signaling that the process is uncertain and imprecise. Modeling human diseases as networks simplifies complex multicellular processes, aids in the understanding of patterns in complex data that people are unable to detect, and thus enhances the precision…

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Review finds many patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 have lower levels of vitamin D

Patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection had considerably lower levels of 25(OH)D (activated vitamin D) than those who were not infected, according to the study. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the underlying virus which leads to the onset of COVID-19 in patients who contract the ailment, and since December 2019 has spread worldwide leading to the ongoing global pandemic. With time, new variants of the disease have begun to sprout as characteristic spike proteins mutate to give the disease…

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Researchers develop implant that restores tactile sensation to damaged nerves

The novel device is an implant that turns touch into voltage, which is transmitted to healthy sensory nerves in accordance to the amount of pressure given to the device. (Photo credit: Tel Aviv University) Traumatic peripheral nerve injury (TPNI) is a condition that affects many trauma patients and can lead to lifelong disabilities resulting in a reduced quality of life. There are currently few options for restoring tactile sensation lost due to TPNI. Surgical nerve reconstruction utilizing allogeneic nerve…

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