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Researchers find a new way to kill antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria can now be killed using a new approach, according to researchers. The new method disables bacteria’s natural defense system, making antibiotics more harmful. The research, which was carried out in lab dishes and on mice, suggests a viable technique for combating so-called superbugs without the need to develop new medicines. “You want to make the already existing antibiotics with good safety profiles more potent,” said senior author Evgeny Nudler, a professor of biochemistry at the New York…

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Promising ovarian cancer treatment proves effective and efficient

Preclinical trials of a new radiopharmaceutical for the treatment of ovarian cancer have shown promising results, with tumor growth and mass significantly reduced after use. The new radiopharmaceutical, which is designed exclusively for ovarian malignancies that are resistant to existing treatment, can be made in 25 minutes at a cheap cost, resulting in higher efficiency than alternative procedures. The new findings were presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2021 Annual Meeting. Each year, more than…

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CDC to have “emergency meeting” on heart inflammation following vaccinations

The CDC said on Thursday that a “emergency meeting” with its experts will be held on June 18th to investigate uncommon but higher-than-expected reports of heart inflammation following doses of the mRNA-based Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines. At a meeting of the Food and Drug Administration’s Vaccine Advisory Committee on Thursday, the CDC revealed that it had found 475 cases of myocarditis and pericarditis in people under 30. According to the CDC, 226 instances of myocarditis and pericarditis following…

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Listening to music near bedtime can disrupt sleep, new research says

Most individuals listen to music throughout the day, especially around their bedtime. Is it possible, though, that this could affect your sleep? When sleep researcher Michael Scullin, Ph.D., associate professor of psychology and neuroscience at Baylor University, found he was waking up in the middle of the night with a song in his head, he identified an opportunity to investigate how music might alter sleep habits. Scullin’s latest research, published in Psychological Science, looked at the link between music…

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Drug commonly used as antidepressant has been found to help fight cancer

Monoamine oxidase inhibitors are a type of medicine used to treat depression. They operate by increasing levels of serotonin, the brain’s “happy hormone.” According to a recent UCLA study, such medications, also known as MAOIs, may offer another health benefit: aiding the immune system’s fight against cancer. Two publications detailing their findings were published in the journals Science Immunology and Nature Communications. “MAOIs had not been linked to the immune system’s response to cancer before,” said Lili Yang, senior…

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Harvard researchers say blood tests can indicate the best exercise regimen for you

Physiological responses to exercise can be highly variable and, until now, unpredictable. According to an interesting new study involving over 650 men and women, the levels of particular proteins in our bloodstreams may predict how well one will respond to various exercise regimens. The research has to be replicated and expanded, but it’s a good start toward a blood test that can tell us what sorts of exercise are best for us and if we’ll get more or less…

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Metformin shows promise as treatment for COVID-19, according to new study

Metformin is a drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a prescription medication used to decrease hepatic (liver) glucose production, to decrease GI glucose absorption and to increase target cell insulin sensitivity. It’s frequently used as an early treatment for type 2 diabetes, which affects more than 34 million Americans and is treated with a mix of diet and lifestyle modifications. However, scientists have discovered that metformin has anti-inflammatory capabilities, though the mechanism behind this is…

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CDC finds COVID-19 vaccines lead to milder disease in breakthrough infections

People who have been vaccinated against coronavirus experience lesser Covid-19 illness than those who have not been vaccinated, according to a recent study from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Fully vaccinated adults are more than 90% protected against illness, according to the study, which looked at more than 3,900 essential employees. According to the ongoing study, even partially vaccinated persons are 81 percent less likely to get infected than those who have not been immunized. “This…

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A breakthrough in the physics of blood clotting

According to new study, published in the journal Biomaterials by Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University modeling the dynamics at play during clot contraction, a still poorly understood phase of blood clotting, gives fresh information on the mechanics and physics of blood clotting. “Blood clotting is actually a physics-based phenomenon that must occur to stem bleeding after an injury,” said Wilbur A. Lam, W. Paul Bowers Research Chair in the Department of Pediatrics and the Wallace H. Coulter…

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Scientists find underlying mechanism behind why space travel weakens our immune system

Microgravity in space disrupts human physiology and is harmful to astronaut health, as indicated with astronauts who have experienced inner ear abnormalities, heart arrhythmia, hypotension, dehydration, and loss of calcium from their bones after their missions. One of the most interesting findings from the Apollo missions was that slightly over half of the astronauts were ill with colds or other diseases within a week after landing. Even dormant viruses, such as the chickenpox virus, had been reactivated in many…

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High caffeine consumption linked to increased risk of blinding eye disease

According to an international multicenter study, drinking a lot of caffeine on a daily basis can more than triple the risk of glaucoma in those who have a genetic susceptibility to high eye pressure. The study, sponsored by Mount Sinai’s Icahn School of Medicine, is the first to show a dietary genetic link associated with glaucoma. Patients with a significant family history of glaucoma may want to limit their caffeine intake, according to research published in the June print…

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UK minister: Delta variant 40 percent more transmissible, vaccinated still protected

According to Britain’s health minister, the Delta variant of the coronavirus is 40 percent more transmissible than the Alpha variant that caused the last wave of outbreaks in the United Kingdom. He went on to say that those who had two doses of the vaccination should be similarly protected against either variation. “That figure, around 40 percent more transmissible, is indeed the latest advice I have,” Health Secretary Matt Hancock told Sky News. According to Public Health England data,…

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FDA may approve first novel Alzheimer’s drug in 20 years

The Food and Drug Administration is about to make one of its most divisive rulings in years, deciding on the destiny of an Alzheimer’s drug that might be the first therapy licensed after almost two decades of unsuccessful attempts to discover a cure for the crippling illness. On Monday, the FDA will make a decision on aducanumab, a medicine that tries to reduce the growth of memory and cognitive impairments in Alzheimer’s patients early in the illness. If authorized,…

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FDA approves obesity drug that helped people cut weight 15%

On Friday, regulators announced that a new version of a popular diabetes medicine would be sold in the United States as a weight-loss treatment. Wegovy, a higher-dose variant of Novo Nordisk’s diabetes medicine semaglutide, has been authorized by the Food and Drug Administration for long-term weight control. Participants in the trials who took Wegovy lost an average of 15% of their body weight, or roughly 34 pounds (15.3 kilograms). Before plateauing, participants dropped weight continuously over 14 months. The…

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Language recovery in stroke patients can now be predicted using computer models of the brain

A group of researchers at Boston University are trying to figure out how the brain processes language and speech, as well as how to effectively rehabilitate those who have lost their capacity to speak due to brain damage caused by a stroke, trauma, or another sort of brain injury. Aphasia is a long-term neurological illness that affects over a million people in the United States and is caused by impairment to the portion of the brain responsible for language…

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